Express Yourself

 STUDENTS FROM COMMERCE HIGH SCHOOL WEIGH IN ON THEIR STRICT DRESS CODE POLICY

STUDENTS FROM COMMERCE HIGH SCHOOL WEIGH IN ON THEIR STRICT DRESS CODE POLICY

By Aaron Ramsey, Dalayja Dickson, Farhio Abdirahman, Destiny Montez, Serena McMahon, Michaela Chesin and Joshua Murray 

Many of the students at the High School of Commerce express concern over a stricter dress code policy which has been enforced heavily in recent months.

The most prevalent question they want to know is simple: Why?

Why are students sent home from school for wearing a different colored shirt? Why is there a limit in the opportunity to express themselves? Why is there rarely ever much of an explanation?

Aaron Ramsey, a senior from the High School of Commerce interviews fellow students on their perception of the dress code policy.

The clothes we wear can often tell stories about the people we are.

Farhio Abdirahman, a junior at the High School of Commerce, speaks on the high school dress code and its relationship to her first amendment right to religious freedom. While she works to understand why the dress code policy is in place, she speaks out on the wrong perception people have about the clothes she wears.

" Wearing a skirt and a different colored shirt doesn't mean I'm a bad person and I'm not here to learn," says Abdirahman.

Roberto Ortiz, the Dean of Students and the baseball coach at the High School of Commerce answers questions about the dress code, addressing concerns of school safety, especially in the light of the many school shootings, from Parkland to Los Angeles, that had occurred in the past year.

Dean Ortiz is interviewed by a group of High School of Commerce and University of Massachusetts students on areas the school can improve, and clearing up communication between faculty and students. Ortiz also speaks on the work he has done to improve these issues, including the fundraiser Fan Cloth which sells Commerce gear to aid the uniform policy while fundraising for the baseball team.

Despite the strict dress code regulations, students find alternative means to express themselves whether that be with their hair, shoes or nails to help tell pieces of their story.

The students say that who they are also can lie in the details.

Dalayja Dickson and Destiny Montez adds charms and colors to their hair as ways to express who they are within a strict dress-code policy.  

"Follow school & district uniform policy" is under the High School Of Commerce's "School Wide Non-Negotiables"

Farhio Abdirahman and Aaron Ramsey pose for a picture to show an outfit they would wear to express themselves.